Macheesmo

Cooking with Confidence
tart
Economical, Main Dishes, Stuffing Stuff, Vegetarian

Mushroom and Leek Galette

by Nick
tart

Wow good.

I was pretty scared when vegetable tart won the poll last week.  The last time I tried a free-form tart on Macheesmo, it didn’t go well.

I had high hopes for this attempt though.  For starters, I was using a Cook’s Illustrated recipe.  That’s normally a really good start to a successful meal.

Second, and maybe more important, I didn’t get cocky.  I read the recipe like 10 times (Cook’s Illustrated isn’t known for being succinct).  I promised myself that I wouldn’t change the recipe at all.

I then immediately changed the recipe.  Luckily, not in any devastating way.

Yield
Serves 4.
Prep Time
Total Time
Print Recipe

Mushroom and Leek Galette

Ingredients

  • Dough:
  • 1 1/4 cups (6.25 ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup (2.75 ounces) whole wheat flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold and cubed
  • 7 tablespoons ice water
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • Filling:
  • 1/2 pound shiitake mushrooms
  • 3/4 pound crimini mushrooms
  • 2 large leeks, sliced thin
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 3-4 ounces Gorgonzola cheese, crumbled
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 large egg, for egg wash

Helpful Equipment

Directions

1) To start dough, mix together flours with sugar and salt. Cut in cold, cubed butter using your fingers or pulse in a food processor until the butter is in pea-sized pieces.

2) Stir in water and vinegar and mix until the dough is saggy. It's okay if it doesn't come together completely at this point. Don't overmix it.

3) Scoop dough out onto plastic wrap. Form dough into a rough rectangle (again, it will still be crumbly). Wrap very tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.

4) Remove dough and roll into a long rectangle, about 8x14 on a well-floured surface. Fold the left 1/3 of the dough into the center, then fold the right 1/3 over it. Rotate the dough 90 degrees, roll it out again, and repeat the fold. Do this one more time. If your dough sticks to the counter, use a dough scraper to scrape it up and use more flour. Then fold the dough (which should be much easier to work with now) into a square and wrap it in plastic wrap again. Refrigerate for another hour.

5) For filling, wash mushrooms and add to a microwave safe bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave on high for 4-5 minutes until soft. Drain mushrooms in a colander. When cool, slice thinly.

6) Slice leeks thinly using just the white and light green sections. Add sliced leeks to a large skillet with a drizzle of olive oil. Cook over medium heat until the leeks are soft, about 4 minutes. Add fresh thyme and sliced mushrooms and continue to cook for another minute or two until the mixture is fairly dry.

7) Remove filling from heat and let cool. Then season with a pinch of salt and pepper and stir in sour cream and mustard.

8) When ready to make galette, preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove dough from fridge 10-15 minutes before making the galette. Roll the dough out into a large 14 inch diameter circle. Use a knife to cut off any edges. Try to make it as round as you can, but it's okay to eyeball it.

9) Transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the center of the dough with olive oil.

10) Add half of the filling to the center of the dough, leaving about 2 inches around the edge. Add 1/2 of the gorgonzola cheese. Top with the rest of the filling and then the rest of the cheese. Drizzle with olive oil.

11) Fold one end of the circle in toward the center, then work around the galette, making folds every few inches.

12) Brush galette with egg wash and transfer to oven. When galette is in oven, turn heat down to 375 and bake for 35-40 minutes until the crust is golden brown.

13) Let cool briefly and serve immediately!

Adapted from Cook's Illustrated Feb. 2012.

Making the Dough

Tart doughs are tricky.  I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve struggled with them.  Frankly, if you haven’t struggled with them you are either a baking prodigy or a liar.

The trick to this dough is not to overwork it in the beginning and let it rest twice in the fridge.  Also, the recipe calls for laminating the dough a bit which means folding it over itself a few times so you develop layers of dough which results in super-flakey crust.

I was worried about this step because it’s the step that proves to be my downfall for things like croissants.  But this is a beginner’s laminated dough.  I didn’t have any issues with it at all.  You won’t either.

Start the dough by mixing together your dry ingredients in a large bowl and then mix in the cubed butter with your fingers.  You could use a food processor for this, but I like using my hands.  Just get the butter into pea-sized pieces and then add your liquid (top right).

Once your liquid is added, stir it together, but don’t over-work it.  There’s no need to bring the dough completely together at this point.  The word CI used to describe the dough is “saggy”.  I prefer the term “crumbly” (bottom left).

Scoop this crumbly dough out onto some plastic wrap, wrap it very tightly and refrigerate it for about an hour.

making

Saggy dough is good.

Lamination Domination

I was almost positive that I was going to botch this step, but it was pretty easy actually.  Once your dough has rested for an hour in the fridge the flour will be better hydrated and it’ll be closer to one full piece when you unwrap it.

Roll it out on a well-floured board to form a long rectangle.  It should be about 8×14 if you want to get specific, but I just eyeballed it (top left).  Then fold the bottom 1/3 of the dough up to the center (top right).  Then fold the top 1/3 down (bottom left).  This basically creates three layers of dough.

Rotate the dough 90 degrees and do the whole rolling and folding process again.  For those that aren’t math inclined, the second time you do this, you’ll have 9 layers of dough (3×3).  The third and last time you do this, you’ll have 27 layers of dough.

This makes the final dough very flakey and awesome and is worth the 10 minutes or so it takes to do it.  Your final dough will be really easy to work with.  Before you roll it out though, wrap it in plastic again and stick in the fridge for another hour so it firms up (bottom right).

laminating

Like pastry, but actually doable.

Ok.  The dough is the hardest part of this guy by a long shot.  The filling is straightforward.

Leeky Shrooms

I’m not a huge fan of microwaves, but Cook’s Illustrated suggested using one to soften up the mushrooms for this recipe.  I’m not really sure why.  You could just slice them and saute them normally, but I figured I would try the microwave thing.

shrooms

The shrooms!

I just rinsed off my shrooms and added them to a microwave safe bowl.  Then covered them with plastic wrap and zapped them for about 4-5 minutes on high.

Seemed to work okay.  Notice that I didn’t slice them yet.

zapped

Microwave at work.

Drain the mushrooms in a colander.  They will release a lot of liquid in the microwave which is the goal.  Then slice them thinly.

For the leeks, slice the white and light green parts thinly and add them to a skillet or medium pot with a drizzle of olive oil.  Cook the leeks over medium heat until they are soft (about 4-5 minutes), then toss in your sliced mushrooms and fresh thyme.

filling

Pretty colors.

Cook this for another few minutes just to combine the flavors.  Then kill the heat and let the filling cool slightly.

You’ll need a few other items to finish off the filling.  The original recipe called for créme fraîche, but I just used sour cream.  Seemed like a fine substitution.

flavors

Flavor town.

Mix in the sour cream and mustard into your filling and maybe hit it with a pinch of salt and pepper.

Filling is done!

filling

Really tasty.

Making the Galette

Once you’re ready to actually make this bad boy, preheat your oven to 400 degrees.  Take your dough out of the fridge a few minutes before you want to roll it out.  Then roll it into a large circle.  Ideally, it would be about a 14 inch circle, but you can just eyeball it.  I do recommend taking a knife and actually cutting a round shape out of the dough if you have any ends that are sticking out because it will make the folding easier.

Transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and brush the center with some olive oil.  Then pile on half of your filling!

NOTE: I made another change to the recipe at this point.  Cook’s Illustrated said to cut tiny holes in the BOTTOM of your galette crust before adding the filling.  Five holes to be exact.  For the life of me, I couldn’t imagine why you would want to do that and it wasn’t explained at any point in the recipe so I just didn’t do it.  No harm done.

tarting

Really easy dough to work with.

Crumble on half of your cheese, then the rest of the filling, then the final bit of cheese.

Now it’s time to fold it!  Start at one end and just fold the dough to the center.

first

The first fold.

Rotate the dough and every few inches, just fold the dough toward the center.

Easy enough right?

folds

Get it?

Eventually, you’ll have this wonderful little galette.  Once you get it folded all the way around, brush the edges of the dough with egg wash (just an egg scrambled with 1 tablespoon water).

This guy is finally ready for the oven!

ready

Don't forget egg wash.

Oven your galette is in the oven, turn the heat down to 375.  Then let it bake for 35-40 minutes.

This guy turned out fantastic.

tart

Nailed it.

The filling for this guy is good, but the crust is amazing.  It’s really flakey and flavorful since it has some whole wheat flour in it.

It’s a bit of work, no doubt, but the results are worth it in my opinion.