Cooking With Confidence
A bit less cooked.  More my style.
Breakfast/Brunch, Economical, Quick and Easy, Stuffing Stuff, Vegetarian

The Griddle Omelet

by Nick

I have been making omelets for as long as I can remember. That said, there are a lot of authorities on omelets and bunch of different techniques so I’m not going to claim that I’m the best at it. But out of all the different varieties, the griddle omelet has to be one of my favorite.

I’m not really sure if “griddle omelet” is even the official name. That’s just what I call it. I would also accept diner omelet or awesome omelet. By cooking the eggs on a griddle, you can make the egg layer really thin which means that you can stuff it with more stuff.

Like this!

The Griddle omelet.

The Griddle omelet.

This kind of omelet is really easy if you have a 5 foot flat top grill like they have in diners. For the average home cook though that isn’t really an option. But you can simulate the effect with a normal griddle, lots of heat, and a little bit of guts. I say you’ll need guts, because there is a step, which you’ll see in a minute, where you think everything is going horrible wrong. It’s not! But it might be scary.

Yield
1 omelet
Prep Time
Total Time

Just a moment please...

Print Recipe The Griddle Omelet

Ingredients

  • 2 or 3 large eggs, beaten very well with a pinch of salt
  • 1 Tablespoon butter for the griddle
  • Fillings! Go crazy. I used some summer squash and zucchini for this version
  • Cheese. I used goat cheese, but again, any cheese will work.
  • Salt and pepper
  • Parsley for garnish (optional)

Helpful Equipment

Directions

1) Sauté fillings for about a minute just to soften them up slightly.

2) Get the griddle hot. A drop of water should dance like crazy on it.

3) Quickly add the butter to the griddle and move it around to coat everything with the spatula.

4) Once the butter stops bubbling, add the eggs. Use a spatula and scoop all the eggs into a rough rectangle.

5) Add the cheese and any other fillings you have.

6) Do a two part fold. Fold the top over the fillings and then the bottom half over the top.

7) Now you have two options: Pull the omelet off the heat. It’s done! You may have some runny egg around the edges, but some people like it like that OR using the spatula, deftly flip (or roll) the omelet over so the seam of the fold is down on the griddle.

8) If you let it cook for another 30 seconds or so like this, then the egg will be completely cooked through. The cheese will be really melted by now also.

Preparing the fillers

Some fillers you may not want to cook ahead of time, but they won’t cook much in this omelet. They will only be on the griddle for a few seconds in the omelet so if you want them cooked at all, do it beforehand.

I sauteed my squash in zucchini for about a minute just to soften them up slightly. Totally personal preference though.

Veggies ready.

Veggies ready.

Take photo of Tipsy

Ok. That’s just for me. She was very intrigued by the omelet process on this day.

What's up Tipsy?

What's up Tipsy?

Making the omelet

Take a deep breath. This is going to all happen very fast. First, get your griddle hot. A drop of water should dance like crazy on it. Then quickly add your butter to the griddle and move it around to coat everything with your spatula.

Once the butter stops bubbling, add your eggs. If your griddle is silly like mine and not completely level, the eggs are going to run all over the place! Have no fear.

Disaster?

Disaster?

Work quickly now, but use a spatula and scoop all your eggs into a rough rectangle. They shouldn’t run away from you this time. They’ll stay right where you put them.

Better?

Better?

Then add your cheese and any other fillings you have. Again the benefit of making an omelet like this is that you can fill them to the brim. Don’t be shy!

Note: If you are using a cheese that is hard to melt like cheddar, definitely put it under your fillings so it will be as close to the griddle as possible. It should melt okay as long as you aren’t using a pound of it.

You can really fill these things.

You can really fill these things.

Then do a two part fold. Fold your top over the fillings and then your bottom half over the top. Now you have two options. 1) Pull the omelet off the heat. It’s done! You may have some runny egg around the edges, but some people like it like that. 2) Using your spatula, deftly flip (or roll) the omelet over so the seam of the fold is down on the griddle.

If you let it cook for another 30 seconds or so like this, then your egg will be completely cooked through. Your cheese will be really melted by now also.

Pretty easy to fold actually.

Pretty easy to fold actually.

So the above photo and the first photo in this post was the omelet I made while taking pictures. Duh. Because there are pictures of it. It probably took me twice as long to cook though because I had to alternate between spatula and camera (skillz). This means that my egg was a bit more cooked than I like it actually.

I made a second omelet on day two without the camera and cooked the eggs more to my liking.

A bit less cooked. More my style.

A bit less cooked. More my style.

Notice the very thin layer of egg around the fillings? I love that. It’s not quite as heavy somehow as a normal omelet even though you are using the same amount of eggs.

You do need a bit of confidence to try this recipe and a quick spatula hand as you need to gets those eggs together pretty fast once they hit the griddle. It’s not that hard though. Once you make one, you’ll get it down really quickly.

Anybody else make their omelets this way? Favorite fillings?

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17 comments on “The Griddle Omelet

  1. Thank you so much for this post. I am very omelet-o-phobic. Your pictures and instructions are excellent. I may be brave enough to try this (and I do love a thin restaurant style omelet).

  2. I actually had the pleasure (once) of using one of those large/big ass griddles in a diner. It was amazing for making lots of pancakes at once. I didn't get to make a nice long & wide omelet though; I would have loved too though.

    After reading this, I now realize I have to get a griddle, my wok isn't the best for long omelets.

  3. I usually mix my ingredients (like cheese, parsley, and mushrooms) into the egg before frying it up, so I completely forgot how much I love filled omelets! Zucchini and tomatoes is my favorite, with the parsley chopped finely and mixed into the egg-part.

    I'm not sure how well this will work in an itty-bitty pan, though…

  4. Brilliant! I love spinache and some sorta melty cheese in mine, but zuccini is on my menu for breakfast tomorrow or maybe dinner.

  5. Thanks for the comments everyone. Yea. Just remember to not be scared if your eggs run all over the place. You can scrape them into shape pretty easily.

    And go crazy with fillings. Any and all are good :)

  6. Hey Nick! Great post…I used to work at a diner, too, and this was so fun! I was wondering – would you mind if I linked to your site? I'm thinking of making a favorite links section on my site. Thanks : )

    Laura

  7. Sounds like I'll need to retry my omelettes sometime soon with this technique. Oh, and not be scared of course. And use plenty of butter…

  8. Wonderful photos and I love your spirit AND your recipe!

    I just bought a grill today and found your recipe for my dinner. Yes, the thinness of the egg layer makes all the difference, otherwise it's just scrambled eggs.

    My Cusinart Griddler has 2 temp controls for each side of the grill so what a boon — I can lightly saute the veggies on one side while I'm freaking out squaring up the eggs on the other side.

    Thanks for a great and entertaining post. I'm now a subscribed fan!

  9. tried this this morning and it turned out perfectly – i always thought an omlet had to be made in a skillet!

    thanks for sharing

  10. many years ago a western omelet was eggs,onion,ham,cheese if you could afford it. in toast of course. all made at once, no precooked ingredients. this was the commercial way,done for speed and economy. When i make one now i am asked where is the peppers,mushrooms and garlic? that is not a western folks,more a spanish or denver. r culver.

  11. Nick, thank you so much for posting this, i tried the recipe this morning and it came out pretty good for this first time, also love the picture of Tipsy

  12. Works great. I looked this up at work (I work as a CAN in the nursing home and we cook for the residents), works fine in a large skillet. Real quick, looks, smells, and tastes pretty good.

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